Category Archives: Raccoons

Raccoons under deck

Raccoon RemovalRaccoon Removal CT

Ground entry points for raccoons: Decks , Sheds, hot tubs.

A good way to find  Raccoon entry points is to take a  walk around the outside of your house looking closely at where the house meets the ground. Are any of the vent covers Damaged or removed ?  Have any doors been left Ajar particularly the basement or rarely used garage door?  Is there missing or muddy siding?  Are you seeing any digging, dirty spots, or loose boards or lattice? Any of these signs can point you to a possible entry point on ground level.  You should do an inspection like this During the spring and fall at minimum. Doing such an inspection a few days after a fresh snowfall is also a great way to find an active den, thou the animals living there normally may be stuck at another den site for the time being.

Raccoons are a creature of habit, they tend to get into somewhat of a routine. Raccoons will have a latrine site close to where they are living.  Raccoon latrines are dangerous and precaution should be taken when working around them. The Raccoon page talks more about this. Raccoon trails are easy to spot on clean surfaces the muddy foot prints are easy to identify.

Below is a series of pictures taken in Connecticut showing a raccoon latrine and trail leading onto a deck.  The home owner informed me that a woodchuck was living under the deck.  My original call to this site was because the house smelled like skunk.  Skunks have taken up residence with the hibernating wood chuck. I have captured five skunks from under this deck,  job is ongoing at this time.  I believe that raccoon may be in the same woodchuck den, yet the breeding skunks spraying inside the den may have forced the raccoons to remove themselves for the time being.

raccoon removal CT
Raccoons Climbing onto a deck

Raccoon removal ct

 

raccoon removal ct
broken sideing, muddy trial up to deck from raccoons

 

Skunk den

Skunk removal CT
skunk den top view

I get asked what skunk dens look like. Here is some pictures of a skunk den site in a retaining wall.  I ended up catching four skunks out of this den before closing off the hole.  This entrance is a lot bigger than a normal den entrance, the typical den entrance is slightly larger than a softball.Skunk Den

These pictures where taken during the breeding season, normally there would be  less sign than pictured here. You can see how well used the trails leading away from this den are.  If the skunks were not removed June-August time frame the home owner would start seeing kits out at all times even during daylight. The young skunks can spray at this time typically they spray more readily than the adult skunks.  The young skunks spray is not as potent as the adults, but can still pack a punch. Skunk trail in snow

I occasionally will catch raccoons, opossums and woodchucks (ground hogs) along with the skunks out of den sites like this. It is possible to have many types of animals coexisting in a one spot, happens most often with woodchucks. Woodchuck dens tend to have many chambers and attract a variety of critters.

For skunk removal service in Connecticut CT give us a call 860-510-6313.

skunk CT
Skunk den in a crawl space CT.

Rabies Still A Danger In Connecticut, But Rates Stay Relatively Low

Rabies Still A Danger In Connecticut, But Rates Stay Relatively Low

Small, Occasional Outbreaks Of Disease Among Wildlife Common, Health Officials Say

February 26, 2012|By KIM VELSEY, kvelsey@courant.com, The Hartford Courant

Although the first few months of 2012 have been marked by a smattering of rabies cases around the state, including a notable incident in Enfield when a resident was forced to fend off a rabid raccoon with a stick, public health officials say that the confirmed cases — 19 so far — are well within normal fluctuations.

Rabies, a viral infection of the nervous system, is transmitted through animal bites or the saliva of an infected animal. In the early stages, it can be effectively treated with a series of vaccines. Enfield had one confirmed case of animal rabies in 2011 and none in 2010. Nearby Windsor Locks had two confirmed cases in 2012 and none in 2011 and 2010.

taken from http://articles.courant.com/2012-02-26/news/hc-rabies-trends-0227-20120223_1_rabies-cases-rabies-spread-contact-with-wild-animals

I found this while browsing the local news.  I have been confronted many times by sick animals. Raccoons and skunks are the most common animals we deal with that are obviously sick.  The signs of rabies can be easily confused with other illness. A “friendly” raccoon can be a rabid raccoon.  I cannot stress this enough do not approach, or feed a wild raccoon. Things can go wrong very quickly with a raccoon.  I would prefer to grab a full grown Coyote than grab a raccoon.  Raccoons are able to pretty much turn in their skin.  It seems that you can grab a raccoon by the back of the neck, and he can spin around and grab you in less than a second. 

Raccoon in attic removal CT step by step

     It all starts with a call. What was described to me on this call I was convinced that this would be a bat or squirrel job. When I arrived on the job I did a preliminary walk around the house. I noticed some vent damage which could be from gray squirrels, raccoons, opossums. I am still thinking possible gray squirrels, or bats let in by previous gray squirrels.

Vent damaged by raccoons
This is a attic vent damaged by raccoons.
 

     I head up into the attic by the time I got near the vent pictured I start hearing young raccoons.  At this point I leave the attic, I did not want to spook the mother raccoon to move her young into an inaccessible area of the attic.

I then head to the roof and get a closer look at the attic vent. Install a positive set trap (trap that is unbaitted that forces the animal into the trap in order to leave the attic)

Closer look at vent damaged by raccoons in CT
Closer look at attic Vent damaged by raccoons
 

The next day my client calls me telling me we have caught mother raccoon on the roof. I was already in rout being that the forecast called for temps in the upper 80s.

I removed the mother and then went inside the attic to retrieve the young. I retrieved the first within 10minutes of being in the attic. I searched the attic and could not locate anymore young. I was convinced their were more young and instructed the home owner to listen out that night.  The next morning I get the call that they did hear another raccoon. I went into the attic and made some raccoon calls. The next of the young showed himself. I retrieved him and did another search of the attic. No more raccoons were found or heard from. I sealed off all the attic vents completing the job.

Raccoon trap set for mother raccoon
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Mother raccoon trapped
Mother raccoon waiting in trap the next day.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
baby raccoon found in attic ct
Baby raccoon found in attic CT
 
 
 
 

Raccoon in bathroom

 

Raccoon trapper CT
Raccoon removal from public bathroom CT

 

This raccoon was removed from a public bathroom today. He decided to pull open a skylight and fall through a screen, effectively trapping himself in a locked bathroom. A worker went into the bathroom and had a close encounter with this raccoon.  Apparently the raccoon acted aggressively to the employee, then climbed a wall into a small attic space. The space was much to tight to employ a catch-pole. Luckily I had a Comstock cage trap on the truck. I installed the trap and the raccoon was removed the next morning. I would like to take this opportunity to thank Jim Comstock for is innovative trap design, this trap was installed upside down on a ceiling.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Raccoons Move into Connecticut Suburbia

Raccoons Move into Connecticut Suburbia

 

Coming soon to your neighborhood – the Masked Bandit and all his friends. He’s curious and cute, but not what you would call a good neighbor.     

Raccoon pest control CT
Raccoon damage to attic vent in a Connecticut cottage Westbrook

 

Raccoons make their homes in many different types of environs. They prefer to live near streams or other water sources in established wooded areas. They inhabit most of the United States and southern parts of Canada.

 

The raccoon’s natural habitat is changing. Urban expansion, agricultural growth and the clear-cutting of forests is forcing the raccoon to migrate, en masse, to suburbs and cities. In fact, more raccoon populations now live in the city than in woodlands.

 

Raccoons are highly intelligent mammals. They have five fingered toes which allow them to manipulate garbage can lids and open containers with ease. They tend to eat whatever their environment supplies. In the wild, they consume nuts, suck eggs, strip fruit trees, and eat frogs and insects. In the city, they consume all kinds of garbage, dog food and wipe out vegetable gardens. They are a nuisance to farmers. A large pack of raccoons will destroy a corn crop and decimate a fruit orchard.

 

Housing developments create the ideal habitat for raccoons. They find attics, basements and large drainage pipes to be dry, dark and warm – the perfect nesting ground. With cities providing easy access food and water sources, and the perfect place to live, it is no wonder the raccoon is changing its habits.

 

Some animal experts believe the raccoon has easily adapted to living among people because the young learn quickly from previous generations. They build upon this knowledge when adjusting to new living conditions, making each successive generation more at home in suburbia than in the woodlands.

 

Many raccoons have never lived in the wild. These are half-wild, half-tame creatures that rely on people for the necessities of life. City-born raccoons have lost their fear of people. Without this fear, their naturally inquisitive tendencies lead them into dangerous situations such as choosing hazardous places to den, like chimneys and fireplace flues.

 

In the city, raccoons have few natural enemies; though they are often the victims of roaming dogs and swift automobiles. With their funny habits and winsome ways, raccoons are a source of amusing entertainment. People tend to consider raccoons as cute, loveable animals. Some people feed raccoons regularly, not realizing they are placing the raccoon in a harmful situation.

 

Cities will continue to grow and farmers will continue to clear woodlands. The raccoon and his family must adjust to the loss of their natural habitat. The raccoon is learning to live side by side with people, but it is a necessary alliance not made by choice.