Rabies Still A Danger In Connecticut, But Rates Stay Relatively Low

Rabies Still A Danger In Connecticut, But Rates Stay Relatively Low

Small, Occasional Outbreaks Of Disease Among Wildlife Common, Health Officials Say

February 26, 2012|By KIM VELSEY, kvelsey@courant.com, The Hartford Courant

Although the first few months of 2012 have been marked by a smattering of rabies cases around the state, including a notable incident in Enfield when a resident was forced to fend off a rabid raccoon with a stick, public health officials say that the confirmed cases — 19 so far — are well within normal fluctuations.

Rabies, a viral infection of the nervous system, is transmitted through animal bites or the saliva of an infected animal. In the early stages, it can be effectively treated with a series of vaccines. Enfield had one confirmed case of animal rabies in 2011 and none in 2010. Nearby Windsor Locks had two confirmed cases in 2012 and none in 2011 and 2010.

taken from http://articles.courant.com/2012-02-26/news/hc-rabies-trends-0227-20120223_1_rabies-cases-rabies-spread-contact-with-wild-animals

I found this while browsing the local news.  I have been confronted many times by sick animals. Raccoons and skunks are the most common animals we deal with that are obviously sick.  The signs of rabies can be easily confused with other illness. A “friendly” raccoon can be a rabid raccoon.  I cannot stress this enough do not approach, or feed a wild raccoon. Things can go wrong very quickly with a raccoon.  I would prefer to grab a full grown Coyote than grab a raccoon.  Raccoons are able to pretty much turn in their skin.  It seems that you can grab a raccoon by the back of the neck, and he can spin around and grab you in less than a second.